Raynaud’s Disease: Are Cold Hands and Feet Causing You Misery?

Pamela Egan Practical Practitioner

 

By: Pamela Egan, FNP-C CDE

 


 

Raynaud’s Disease: Are Cold Hands and Feet Causing You Misery?

 

 

What is Raynaud’s Disease and what are its Symptoms?


By: Pamela Egan, NP, ABAAHP Diplomat

AUGUST 21, 2009

Dear Pam,

For some years now I’ve been suffering from really cold hands and cold feet and sometimes they are so cold that I can’t hold on to things. I’ve been diagnosed with Raynaud’s Disease. Do you have any other suggestions to warm up my hands & feet?

For many people, Raynaud’s Disease isn’t only triggered by cold weather, it can also be caused by sudden changes of temperature such as touching cold objects.

In Raynaud’s the blood supply to the body’s extremities is temporarily blocked, the fingers change color looking very white- almost dead. They then turn blue and finally go bright red when blood flows back into them again. The whole process can be agonizing; it’s been compared to shutting your fingers in a car door. Besides the usual gloves and heating aids, there is a mineral that can warm you inside out.

The simple mineral (Iodine) Iodoral is like an internal heater. David Brownstein, M.D. explains in his book Iodine, Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It how the thyroid requires iodine to produce its hormones and to regulate the body’s metabolism. Hypothyroidism is indicated by a low metabolic rate. Some of the many symptoms that indicate a hypothyroid state include: brittle nails, cold hands and feet, dry skin, elevated cholesterol, fatigue, inability to concentrate, infertility, menstrual irregularities, muscle cramps and weakness, poor memory, puffy eyes, and weight gain. Hypothyroidism is common in a state of iodine deficiency and Brownstein has found that proper iodine supplementation often results in curing or improving the hypothyroid condition.

Worldwide, we are experiencing epidemic proportions of iodine deficiency, in part due to deforestation, soil erosion, and poor farming practices that deplete minerals from the soil and yield iodine-deficient crops. There are other contributing factors that exacerbate this disturbing global problem.

Exposure to toxic chemicals hinders the uptake of iodine in the body as the toxins compete for iodine receptor sites and inhibit the body’s ability to absorb this valuable mineral. These toxins include a group of elements known as halides (and their derivatives), all of which have similar chemical structures. The halides consist of bromide, fluoride, chloride and iodide, the latter being the only one with therapeutic effects in the body.

In the 1980s, bromine (a bromide derivative) replaced iodine as a bread dough ingredient. Bromine is a known breast carcinogen. This singular change by the food industry resulted in an epidemic of bromide toxicity and increases in thyroid disorders, thyroid cancer and other illnesses resulting from iodine deficiency. Bromine is also used in crop fumigation, pest control, in some carbonated drinks and several prescription medications.

The body does not produce iodine and it is often difficult to get adequate levels from food; however, the ocean is an abundant source. Sea vegetables (sea weed) are a concentrated source of iodine, and although fish contain this mineral, most also have high levels of mercury.

The Raynaud’s Association is available to answer your questions and provide more information. Their helpline number is 1-800-280-8055 or email at info@raynauds.org.

Wellness & Anti-Aging Clinic
1116 W. 21’st Ave.
Covington, Louisiana 70433
Phone: (985) 892-3031
Fax: (985) 892-9504
Email: info@pamelaegan.com

 

 

Pamela Egan, MN, NP, CDE, ABAAHP Diplomat is a board certified Adult & Family Nurse Practitioner, Certified Diabetes Educator, and has completed a Fellowship in Anti-Aging & Regenerative Medicine. She can be reached at 985-892-3031 or www.pamelaegan.com.

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